Flower Spotlight: Nasturtium has all the Beauty and none of the Fuss!

Flower Spotlight: Nasturtium has all the Beauty and none of the Fuss!

If you aren’t familiar with nasturtium, then you’ll be thrilled to get to know this hardy, versatile beauty. Nasturtium rewards even novice gardeners and poor soil with vibrantly-colored, fragrant blooms. And nasturtium has a few “hidden talents,” as well! Read more to learn about one of our favorite flowers.

Nasturtium: The Low-Maintenance Beauty

how to grow nasturtium

Nasturtium are one of the most no-fuss flowers available. Got poor soil? No problem! Nasturtium actually prefer nutrient-poor soil, so you don’t need to worry about a lot of fertilizing. Forget to water your garden sometimes? No worries! This beauty is drought-tolerant, so it doesn’t mind a few dry spells. Lack sunny spots in your garden? That’s OK! Nasturtium can grow in partial shade. Nasturtium is so easy to plant and grow, gardening experts often recommend it as a teaching plant to help children learn to garden.  But you would never guess how low-maintenance these flowers are by looking at them; their eye-catching blooms boast more than enough allure to rival many fussier flowers.

 

Why we Love Nasturtium

nasturtium orange2_c_r

Nasturtium’s beauty and hardiness are enough to make it a winner, but this flower has many more “talents.” Nasturtium is an edible flower, so it will beautify your dinner table as well as your garden. Tuck a vibrant red or orange nasturtium bloom beside the scoop of homemade ice cream you serve your dinner guests, and you’ll make an average dessert instantly elegant. Nasturtium also have a lovely fragrance, which makes them a wonderful choice for dried flowers. The foliage is also edible, and has a distinctive peppery flavor. And you and your family won’t be the only ones who appreciate these beautiful blooms: nasturtium flowers attract butterflies, so they will make your garden more colorful in more ways than one.

 

Get to Know Nasturtium!

how to grow nasturtium

Nasturtium officinale, which has white blooms, is perennial in USDA Hardiness Zones 3a through 11a, which covers almost all of the U.S. Other types of nasturtium are annuals in cooler parts of the country. Nasturtium makes a good ground cover plant, container plant, or border plant. To grow nasturtium, you can transplant seedlings into your garden when the danger of frost has passed, or plant seeds in your garden after the last spring frost. Plant seeds ½ inch deep and 12 inches apart, and expect to see plants emerge within 7 to 10 days.

 

Happy gardening! Stop by our website for more ways to skip the hassle and enjoy your summer.

 

Photo courtesy of Crystal, Grant Montgomery, Audrey, and Sarah Sammis.

Discover how to grow nasturtium and why it's one of our favorite low-maintenance flowers!
If you aren’t familiar with nasturtium, then you’ll be thrilled to get to know this hardy, versatile beauty. Nasturtium rewards even novice gardeners and poor soil with vibrantly-colored, fragrant blooms. And nasturtium has a few “hidden talents,” as well! Read more to learn about one of our favorite flowers.

 

 

Find out how to grow nasturtium and which climate they thrive in with our guide!

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